FYI: Web Resources:

Image Processing
ImageJ window showing histogram and Analyze tools.
Figure 1:  Image J Histogram and Calculation Menu.

At the recent National Imaging Technology in Education Conference (Rochester, NY), middle- and high-school students demonstrated individual and class projects highlighting imaging technology in the classroom: comparing lichen growth over time, measuring crystal growth, and measuring volcanoes on Mars and Venus to mention a few. One class learns biology by writing its own online lab manual using digital images that the students take! At the same conference, teachers explained how they use digital imaging and processing in their classrooms to map the moon, to study the preservation of farm lands, to introduce weather and oceanography images into class projects (a CD of this conference will be available through the CIPE site listed below).

Image Processing can be used to enhance images as well as to extract information from images. For classroom teachers, most of the software and images are free. Image analysis in K-12 classrooms can be used to promote inquiry, science, art, and mathematics goals

If you would like to take the plunge and use image processing in your classroom this year, web resources are listed below. [These URLs were "live" in August, 2000. This page and links will be available for a short time at http://www.canby.com/hemphill/FYIIP2000.htm .]


Imaging Programs:
Scion Image Window showing measuring tool activated.
     Figure 2.  Scion Image Measuring Tool.

 Lessons and Imaging Help:CISLab Image showing Calculations.

                                                   Figure 3:  CISLab Calculation Menu

School/Student Projects:


Images:

Once you have a freeware or shareware program to use for imaging, where do you find images on which to use it? The preeminent use of NIHImage has been in medical imaging: microscopic images and, especially, Magnetic Resonance images (MRI). It is now used to extract data from images in many other disciplines, such as earth and planetary science.


Rosa Hemphill
August 2000
Oregon Episcopal School
Portland, Ore.